Hamburg Habor
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10 Things To Do In Hamburg – Germany

Hamburg is regarded as the harbor city, with high international status. It has one of the busiest and oldest ports in Europe. Commonly known as the gateway to Germany because of the constant shipment of goods without duty charges. Hamburg is Germany’s second largest city after Berlin, it’s a city with so many beautiful attractions for tourists to explore, from the fish market to the very fun-filled St. Pauli and the very infamous reeperbahn.

If it has been long you visited Hamburg or looking to pick a tourist destination, now is a wonderful time to consider visiting. Now let’s look at some great places to explore while in Hamburg.

1.  Hamburg Harbor

Hamburg Habor
Hamburg Habor

This is definitely the number one on our list. There are so many ways to enjoy the hamburg harbor. You can start with a boat ride, take a walk around the water –front or enjoy seafood at the exquisite Rive restaurant while watching the great view from the port.

2. Elbphilharmonie

Elbphilharmonie
Elbphilharmonie

The Elbphilharmonie is particularly one of Hamburg’s tallest high-rise building. Regardless of its big size, the Elbphilharmonie is a beauty to behold, with sparkly lighting, exotic quality, and its mystifying profile which has been compared to the waves. The amazing concert has room for 2,100 spectators and if you love music you owe it to yourself to hear the Elbphilharmonie Orchestra play in one of the most acoustically advanced venues ever built.

3. Hamburg Fish Market

Hamburg Fish Market
Hamburg Fish Market

For the love of good food, fresh exotic fruits, teas and assorted nuts from different parts of the world the Hamburg fish market is a place to be. From the different livestock and animals, the 300 years free to all market, very close to the historic fish auction hall is open on Sundays between 5 and 9a.m. You have to be up early if you want to get the best buy. Over 70,000 visitors walk the many stands along the Elbe every day.

4. Miniatur Wunderland

Miniatur Wunderland
Miniatur Wunderland

Despite being described as the world’s largest model railway, Hamburg’s Miniatur Wunderland is really much more than simply a train layout. This beautiful new attraction is the world’s largest model railway, boasting more than 12,000 meters of track and 890 trains. Built on a truly big scale, it covers 1,150 square meters with more planned. But over the last 16 years scale models of Italy, Hamburg, the United, States, Switzerland and Knuffingen’s airport have been added, while many more are in the pipeline for the 2020s. All these places have thousands of automated moving parts, from people to traffic, controlled by a sophisticated computer.

5. Kunsthalle Hamburg

Kunsthalle Hamburg
Kunsthalle Hamburg

Kunsthalle Hamburg is one of Germany’s top art galleries. There are numerous altarpieces, works by local artists of the 14th century, and Dutch masters of the 16th and 17th centuries. Again, worthy of note are its fine collections of 19th-century German and French paintings, in addition to substantial modern and contemporary art collections. Several fun games for kids are available. Another notable art collection is housed at the Deichtorhallen, one of the largest galleries of contemporary art and photography in Europe.

6. St. Michael’s Church

St. Michael’s Church
St. Michael’s Church

The St. Michael’s church was built in the Baroque style from 1750 to 1762 and is one of the city’s most notable landmarks. St. Michael’s church is among the most famous of churches in Hamburg , from its very high tower, commonly referred to as “Michel,” and is accessible by both stairs and an elevator, viewing platforms offer excellent view of the city and port, a particular treat during their regular extended evening openings. Another nearby church of note is St. James’s, an amazing 14th-century edifice.

7. Ohlsdorf Cemetery

Ohlsdorf Cemetery
Ohlsdorf Cemetery

Ohlsdorf Cemetery is the world’s largest and most important rural cemetery. Measuring up to 966 acres and boasting 12 chapels, it’s where more than 1.5 million burials have taken place in some 280,000 burial sites. This is the cemetery you’ll find the Hamburg Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, where more than 400 allied prisoners-of-war are buried, along with many who died in battles on German soil.

8. The Museum of Art and Crafts

The Museum of Art and Crafts
The Museum of Art and Crafts

The Hamburg’s Museum of Art and Crafts is ranked alongside the Bavarian National Museum in Munich as one of the country’s most iconic show of German, European, and Asian applied art. It was established in 1874 and modeled after London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, it’s particularly well known for its displays of china, furniture, and silver from northern Germany, applied art from East Asia, and a collection of works by Oskar Kokoschka.

9. Museum of Ethnology

Museum of Ethnology
Museum of Ethnology

The Hamburg Museum of Ethnology (Museum für Völkerkunde Hamburg) was established in 1879 and is considered one of the largest such museums in Europe, having more than 700,000 artifacts and documents. Some these include the Jewish mappot, the binder used to cover a Torah, dating from 1711; an African exhibition with traditional cultural and religious items; and fun hands-on exhibits such as foosball, xylophones, and cameras.

10. Hafencity

Hafencity
Hafencity

The largest urban building project in Europe in the 21st century, also known as the future of Hamburg. The harbor city is expected to double the population of Hamburg with thousands of new waterfront apartments, stores, restaurants. The big project will be finished in 2025, but you can already enjoy some of Europe’s most visionary architecture here.

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